The Tel Aviv Review

The Spoils of Empire

Dr Itay Lotem discusses the memory of colonialism in Britain and France, where in both countries, though in different ways, memory is more about issues of the present than about the past

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From Romania, For Cash

Dr Radu Ioanid, Romanian Ambassador to Israel and historian of Romanian Jewry, discusses how, over decades, hundreds of thousands of Romanian Jews were exchanged for money, livestock and goods

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What Would Susan Sontag Say?

Philosopher and cultural critic Susan Sontag spent a lifetime thinking about the mysterious space between reality and representation. Benjamin Moser’s acclaimed biography captures her story with photographic complexity, leaving only a longing for Sontag’s perspective on life today.

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The Broke Woke

Batya Ungar-Sargon believes woke culture has created a smokescreen of racial identity politics that obfuscates the real force tearing American society apart: class inequality. But it took the liberal media to exponentially amplify the problem. Her new book explains why.

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Israel’s Ellis Island, Behind Barbed Wire

Quarantine wasn’t invented for corona. At the start of statehood, Israel encouraged mass immigration while seeking to prevent mass disease by putting immigrants through a quarantine camp. Rhona Seidelman, a historian of medicine and public health, examines the camp’s legacy both remembered and forgotten

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Labor’s Love’s Lost

Dr Laura Wharton discusses her book “Is the Party Over? How Israel Lost its Social Agenda,” analyzing the ideological and institutional decline of the Labor Party up until the 1970s

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Religiously Democratic?

Prof. Daniel Statman discusses his new co-authored book “State and Religion is Israel,” a joint legal and philosophical attempt to conceptualize the role of religion in democratic regimes

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But Somebody Has to Do It

In “Dirty Work: Essential Jobs and the Hidden Toll of Inequality in America,” Eyal Press takes a tough look at the people squeezed in the middle of America’s moral pyramid

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Kahane Lives On

Although he came to prominence in Israel, as the undisputed emblem of the far-right, Rabbi Meir Kahane was a quintessential American Jew, claims Prof. Shaul Magid in his new book

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The Past Is Never Dead – But Maybe It Should Be

After reporting on the cruelest wars of the late 20th century, journalist and cultural critic David Rieff concluded that remembering history was no defense against repeating it, and could even be a culprit

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