Episodes

The “Low Marx?” Edition

Are ultra-Orthodox attacks on Labor Party candidate, Reform Rabbi Gilad Kariv, legitimate? Has Israel’s right just embraced the labor movement? What is so infuriating about political correctness?

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Laughing Out Loud in Hebrew

There are so many ways to say, “You’ve gotta be kidding me,” in Hebrew. We’ll learn a few of them and learn how to write LOL in Hebrew

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A Rainbow of Complexities in Palestine

Why is the LGBTQ global movement intensely invested in the Palestinian cause, and when does a social movement grow or plateau? Sa’ed Atshan asks and answers these questions in “Queer Palestine and the Empire of Critique.”

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Carrots & Sticks

Is there a fair way to cajole people to vaccinate? Fining ’em? Keeping ’em from working? Banning them from basketball arenas? Public shaming?

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Likud, 2021: What’s Left of the Right?

Some longtime Likudniks lament that the party ain’t what it used to be. If that’s true, then what is it now?

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The “Carrots & Sticks” Edition

With longtime MK Limor Livnat’s defection from the Likud, who says the party ain’t what it used to be? What incentives and sanctions should be used to cajole reticent people to vaccinate? Is a “Green New Deal” what we need?

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All Jokes Aside

The Hebrew word צחוק means laughter. We combine צחוק with different verbs and prepositions to express how hard we laughed at something or just how funny something is. But as is often the case with Hebrew slang, when used in the right context, and with the appropriate intonation and word-pairing, the word צחוק can be no laughing matter.

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Idiomatic Expression

When Robert Berman, an American Jewish immigrant to Israel began studying Arabic, he didn’t stop until he had written a book full of idioms. Together with language expert Christy Bandak as editor, the linguistic duo explain what “his face is good on me” conveys in Arabic, and why there is a whole chapter on fingers.

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The Revolution Is in the Mail

New political magazines, printed on paper and sent in the mail, hope to foment revolution in Israeli politics. Do they have a chance of influencing people, in an age of Twitter?

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