Israel in Translation

“The Book of Disappearances”

Set in contemporary Tel Aviv 48 hours after Israelis discover all their Palestinian neighbors have vanished, the novel unfolds through alternating narrators, Alaa, a young Palestinian man who converses with his dead grandmother in the journal he left behind when he disappeared, and his Jewish neighbor, Ariel, a journalist struggling to understand the traumatic event.

Read More

Nora the Mind Reader

What if, when you were in Kindergarten, your mother had given you a magic wand that allowed you to read people’s minds? Well, that’s just what happens in Orit Gidali’s book, “Nora the Mind Reader,” which will bring to a close our month of illustrated children’s books written by Israeli poets and writers.

Read More

Leah Goldberg’s “Room for Rent”

No Israeli childhood experience would be complete without Leah Goldberg. Her story “Room for Rent” was published in 1948 and is one of the most classic children’s books available in Hebrew.

Read More

Shira Geffen’s “The Heart-Shaped Leaf”

This month we continue our spotlight on beautifully written and illustrated Israeli children’s books translated into English with “The Heart Shaped Leaf,” by Shira Geffen and illustrated by David Polonsky.

Read More

“The Mermaid in the Bathtub”

Some of Marcela’s favorite children’s books have been written by well known poets and illustrated by some of Israel’s most talented artists. This episode features “The Mermaid in the Bathtub,” written by Nurit Zarchi and illustrated by Rutu Modan.

Read More

Nano Shabtai’s “Corn”

For the next few weeks, we will feature new, up-and-coming writers whose work have recently been translated to English. Nano Shabtai is known in Hebrew arts and letters as a poet, dramatist and director.

Read More

Ronny Someck’s “The Milk Underground”

Ronny Someck’s poems in “The Milk Underground” deals with being a father of girls—adolescent and teenaged, young women. They explore the fraught territory of daughter’s bodies—body as dowry, body as a locus for pleasure and for betrayal, and the poems extend a fatherly embrace to the girls after their pained mother has broken off relations.

Read More

Ayelet Tsabari’s “Barefoot and Enlightened”

Ayelet Tsabari, born in Israel to a large family of Yemeni descent, grew up in a suburb of Tel Aviv, served in the Israeli army, and travelled extensively. As an Israeli writer, Ayelet is unusual in that she usually writes in English, not Hebrew, though the essay we are featuring today was originally written in Hebrew.

Read More

Welcoming in the Ushpizin: Poems for Sukkot

We’re currently in the days of Sukkot, in which Jews everywhere dwell in a temporary structure called a Sukkah. One of the customs of Sukkot is inviting guests for meals in the Sukkah, close friends or needy strangers.

Read More

Amichai Chasson’s “Rami Levy in Talpiot”

This week, Marcela reads from Amichai Chasson, who like many international poets encountering America, has written his Walt Whitman in the supermarket poem titled, “Rami Levy in Talpiot.”

Read More