The Tel Aviv Review

Do mention the wall: Why borders still matter

Prof. David Newman – Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Science at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, professor of political science specializing in political geography and, more precisely, in borders – explains why borders are becoming more and more relevant today, even though the world is the proverbial global village.

Viewing the conflict through the Olive Tree Programme

The Olive Tree Programme at City University, London brings Israeli and Palestinian students together to study the conflict.

The Israeli who turned an entire nation on its head

Dr Moshe Cohen-Gil talks about his new book “The Israelis who Wished to Cure the World,” which tells the story of the pioneers of alternative medicine in Israel.

The lesser-known victims of the Holocaust

Dr Robert Rozett talks about the Hungarian Jewish forced laborers on the Eastern Front.

Let them eat carrots: The role of incentives in peace processes

Why do sanctions always gain the upper hand? Dr. Nimrod Goren, of Mitvim and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, explains.

Kids, try this at home: The formation of the Hebrew literary canon for children

Prof. Yael Darr discusses the not-so-dogmatic indoctrination of Hebrew-speaking children in the 1930s-1950s.

Herzl: The trials and tribulations of a visionary

Prof. Shlomo Avineri, one of Israel’s most eminent political scientists, a veteran lecturer at the Hebrew University, and former Director-General of the Foreign Ministry, and author of the book titled Herzl: Theodore Herzl and the foundations of the Jewish State, that was recently published in English.

Counterculture in escape from Israeliness

Avi Pitchon’s “Rotten Johnny and the Queen of Shivers: Counterculture in Escape from Israeliness” chronicles his personal involvement in a very specific turning point in the history of Israeli culture, both homegrown and adopted from overseas – the emergence of punk culture in the 1980s.

The plight of ‘post-ethnic’ young Israelis

On paper, Israelis of mixed ethnicity – those of both Ashkenazi and Sephardi descent – are the realization of the Zionist dream of the gathering of the diasporas; but in reality, their situation is no less troublesome.

How Freud can solve the tension inherent to multiculturalism

Psychoanalysis may serve as good meeting point between the calling of universalism and the value of pluralism, which has long since been the bane of multiculturalism