Episodes

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The “The Distance from You to Me” Edition

We discuss 1) Ayelet Shaked’s aspirations to lead Israel’s religious right, even though she’s as secular as can be 2) the woes of southern resort city Eilat 3) a week after we buried another Ethiopian kid killed by a police officer, what accounts for our omnipresent racism?

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This Week’s Israeli Soundtrack

We bring you the latest musical releases, including new singles from The Ultras, Hatikva 6, Idan Raichel, and Avraham Tal, to name a few.

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Adi Assis’s Poetry of Social Critique and Personal Pain

The poetry of Adi Assis injects us with the distress that consumes his days and nights. His laments madden us as we find ourselves rare witness to circumstances usually hidden from view, and even more profoundly, to the hidden reaches of the poet's heart.

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Mm Hm, That’s Exactly Right

How do we agree with someone in Hebrew? How do we say, I hear you, totally, yeah, right, spot on, exactly?

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Liberalism and Nationalism: Friends or Enemies?

“Liberal” and “nationalist” sound like mutually exclusive forces that cannot coexist. Yet Yuli Tamir, scholar, peace activist and a former government minister, makes the liberal case for nationalism, and argues for a nationalism that is liberal, in her book “Why Nationalism.”

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The “Parties Like It’s 1999” Edition

We discuss 1) the recombobulation of the Left, with reconditioned leaders: Labor's Amir Peretz, Meretz's Nitzan Horowitz and Ehud Barak of the no-name-party 2) is anything left of the right-wing Two-State-Solution? 3) whether hummus has a role to play in finding regional peace, following a new book that asserts that it might!

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“My Flesh Speaks of God”

Today we read poetry by Haya Esther, a woman born into an ultra orthodox household in Jerusalem, and who was fired from her job in a girl’s Haredi school after her first book of poems was published in 1983. She went on to write 18 volumes of poetry.

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This Cake Is “End of the Road”

In Hebrew, סוף סוף (sof-sof) means at last. Sof-sof can also mean finally, but not in all situations. Confusing, right? And how would we say final and infinite in Hebrew, which are derived from the word סוף, end?

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The Old/New Middle East

Moshe Sakal's novel “The Diamond Setter” brings old Middle Eastern themes into contemporary Israel, and weaves them into a story comprising of a rediscovered Jewish-Arab heritage, reinvented Israeliness, cross-border relations and homosexuality.

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“I Am Indeed a Sheigetz of the Gentile Persuasion”

Shane Baker, a theater director and creator, recounts his unusual entry into Yiddish theater and his efforts to revive a one-glorious artistic tradition in New York city.

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The “Huddled Masses Yearning for GDP?” Edition

We discuss 1) Blue & White party's dilemma: Should they attack the ultra-Orthodox, whom they may want as coalition partners after the election? 2) the Trump “Deal of the Century” economic plan unveiled this week 3) the news that the second to last movie theater in Tel Aviv may soon close

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Kol Cambridge’s Dudu Aharon Album Special

Dudu Aharon just dropped his 8th album which we’ve been patiently anticipating for four years. Now that it’s finally here, we’re holding an album-listening party!

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The Poetry of Ayat Abou Shmeiss

In her second book, Ayat Abou Shmeiss's subjects include an examination of her life as a mother and as a student at the Open University, where she is finishing a degree in political science. The poet has a clear grasp of her position. “I’m this and that” she said.

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Shalom Stranger

How do we greet a stranger in the elevator, in Hebrew? How about a neighbor from our building? Could we perhaps just look down and not say anything at all? Guy presents a concise guide to Israeli elevator etiquette 101.

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Can Constitutions Save Us?

All societies are divided, and constitutions are supposed to set the rules for a peaceful life. In her book co-authored with Asli Bali, “Constitution Writing, Religion and Democracy,” Hanna Lerner explains that Israel isn't the only country with a thorny constitutional complex.

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The Name Is Arendt. Hannah Arendt

Ken Krimstein, an illustrator and graphic novelist, discusses his new book “The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt: A Tyranny of Truth.”

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The “Pleas Don’t Please” Edition

We discuss 1) the announcement by Avigdor Lieberman that he'll force Likud and Blue & White to form a centrist, secular govt. 2) the plea bargain that put an end to Sara Netanyahu’s 4 year long trial for ordering expensive take-out food in contravention of govt. rules 3) on its 100th anniversary, what role does Ha’aretz play in Israeli politics and public life

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“The Life:” The Biography of Flavius Josephus

We continue what we began in last week's episode, discussing the historian Flavius Josephus, focusing on his biography, “The Life.”

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Hold on Tight and Don’t Let Go

Letting go of someone or something can be a difficult thing to do. How do we let it all go, in Hebrew? Guy explains.

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Getting Better All the Time?

Michael A. Cohen and Micah Zenko have a radical proposal: The world is getting better, not worse. Their book “Clear and Present Safety” looks beyond sensational and short-term political trends and finds that all global indicators have improved - as a result, Americans need not live in perpetual fear.

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The “Labor Savers?” Edition

We discuss 1) who should replace Labor Party head Avi Gabbay 2) new tricked-out hi-tech checkpoints that dramatically reduce the time it takes for Palestinians to enter Israel to work 3) newly appointed Likud Minister of Justice, Amir Ohana, the first out minister in Israel’s history, who was jeered and hounded from the Jerusalem Pride Parade

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Your Israeli Soundtrack for Pride Week

Kol Cambridge is joining the annual TLV pride celebrations with our soundtrack dedicated to the best pride songs over the years and celebrating Israel’s LGBT artists.

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Josephus’s “Jewish Antiquities”

To mark the completion of the Shavuot holiday, this week Marcela reads from Josephus’s account of the giving of the Torah, in his volume “Jewish Antiquities.”

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The City That Never Stops

Guy noticed that even his most advanced students have problems with the Hebrew words for city, town, and municipality, so he decided to dedicate this episode to these words, once and for all.

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Cause or Effect? The Media’s Role in Democratic Decline

Having experienced virtually the most devastating crisis in its history, what can the media do to safeguard democracy, in an increasingly hostile environment? Susan Glasser, staff writer for The New Yorker magazine, analyzes the challenges of the American media in the age of Trump.

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