Episodes

The “Shots & Tots” Edition

Was Netanyahu’s deal to give Pfizer data on everyone who got the vaccine illegal? Why did a judge order the confiscation of a 2002 film about the IDF’s 2002 incursion into Jenin? What do the names we give our babies say about our society?

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I Can’t Stand It

Sometimes we just gotta be honest with ourselves and say, “אני לא סובל אותו” (I can’t stand him). Guy explains the Hebrew root סבל, which means suffering or misery, and how it is linked to muscular endurance, horrible traffic jams and passive verbs.

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The Untold Stories of Iran’s Jews

At times reminiscent of 19th century European Jewry, at others of American Jewry in the 20th, the modern history of Iran’s Jews varies radically from other Jewish histories in the Middle East. A new book focuses on the unique case of Iranian Jewry.

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The Medium Is the Message?

Why will Israelis never ever delete Whatsapp from our phones, no matter how much private information they fork over to Facebook?

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Lift My Eyes Unto the Hills

Idealists? Dropouts? True-Believers? Anarchists? Pioneers? Thugs? What should we make of “Hilltop Youth”?

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Your Israeli Soundtrack for the New Year

Join us as we kick off the new year with a musical bang. We listen to the new Ultras album, check out new music from Omer Adam, Shrek & Tzukush, and peek into Adi Ulmansky’s latest work.

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The “But For Mel” Edition

Are “religious-Zionist” political parties no longer viable? What should we make of the pious, thuggish, anarchist and often beautiful kids they call “Hilltop Youth”? Why can’t Israelis never ever delete Whatsapp from our phones?

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Yaniv Iczkovits’s “The Slaughterman’s Daughter”

On this episode, Marcela reads an excerpt from Yaniv Iczkovits’s novel “The Slaughterman’s Daughter: The Avenging of Mende Speismann by the Hand of her Sister Fanny.”

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Save Me a Spot, Will You?

Is it okay to save an open parking spot for someone, shooing away other drivers? Well, that’s what many Tel-Avivim do. It’s called לשמור חניה, and Guy explains the phenomenon.

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