israel in translation

Nano Shabtai’s “Corn”

For the next few weeks, we will feature new, up-and-coming writers whose work have recently been translated to English. Nano Shabtai is known in Hebrew arts and letters as a poet, dramatist and director.

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Ronny Someck’s “The Milk Underground”

Ronny Someck’s poems in “The Milk Underground” deals with being a father of girls—adolescent and teenaged, young women. They explore the fraught territory of daughter’s bodies—body as dowry, body as a locus for pleasure and for betrayal, and the poems extend a fatherly embrace to the girls after their pained mother has broken off relations.

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Ayelet Tsabari’s “Barefoot and Enlightened”

Ayelet Tsabari, born in Israel to a large family of Yemeni descent, grew up in a suburb of Tel Aviv, served in the Israeli army, and travelled extensively. As an Israeli writer, Ayelet is unusual in that she usually writes in English, not Hebrew, though the essay we are featuring today was originally written in Hebrew.

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Welcoming in the Ushpizin: Poems for Sukkot

We’re currently in the days of Sukkot, in which Jews everywhere dwell in a temporary structure called a Sukkah. One of the customs of Sukkot is inviting guests for meals in the Sukkah, close friends or needy strangers.

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Amichai Chasson’s “Rami Levy in Talpiot”

This week, Marcela reads from Amichai Chasson, who like many international poets encountering America, has written his Walt Whitman in the supermarket poem titled, “Rami Levy in Talpiot.”

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Etgar Keret’s “Ladder”

Rosh Hashanah begins Sunday night—it is the beginning of the Jewish new year. To usher it in, we read an excerpt from Etgar Keret’s short story, “Ladder,” published in his brand-new English language collection, “Fly Already.”

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Frayed Light

Yesterday, Yonatan Berg’s first poetry collection ,“Frayed Light,” appeared in English translation. The poems in this collection gather his experiences of having been born to a religious family and later giving up the religious lifestyle, living in a settlement and then moving to Jerusalem, and military service, into heartfelt narrative poems.

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“My Essay on Stereotypes”

Israeli elections are just one day shy of a week away, and now might be a good opportunity to examine the use of stereotypes to shut down important conversations that we might have, as we elect the people who will represent us.

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Etgar Keret’s “Fly Already”

Yesterday something wonderful happened—Etgar Keret’s newest short story collection, “Fly Already,” appeared in the world. This collection contains all the charm, the absurdities, the intelligence and surreal sense of Keret’s previous collections, but this time, most of the stories are somewhat longer.

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Buses and Shoes

“He didn’t call himself a writer, but rather a craftsman,” Haim Be’er says about Yossel Birstein. Today Marcela reads a story containing Birstein’s two great loves: Buses and Shoes.

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