language

It’s as Simple as That

The word פשוט (pashut) means “simple” in Hebrew. Knowing that, how would you attempt to say “simplify”, “simplicity,” or “simpleton”? Guy explains all the complexities behind the seemingly simple root פשט.

Learning from Israelis’ 2018 Music-Listening Habits

What can we learn from the music-listening habits of Israelis in 2018? Spotify published the most popular music listened to by Israelis this year. We revisit our archives to remind ourselves when and why we used these songs in previous episodes.

The Fixture Needs Fixing

Dropped your phone? Did the screen crack? It needs fixing! The Hebrew word you’ll need to know is Tikun, from the root תקנ. Tikunim (plural of tikun) also means corrections, amendments, alterations. Not familiar with the תקנ root and its related words? We can fix that!

The Streetwise Center for Hebrew Learners

Gather = lerakez. Center = merkaz. Concentrated = merukaz. Coordinator = merakez. All these words share a common Hebrew root: רכז. Put aside all possible distractions because today’s episode is laser-focused on the root RKZ.

Explaining Common Mistakes in Spoken Hebrew

We often hear the same errors made over and over again by those learning to speak Hebrew. Some sound worse than others. But once pointed out, they’ll be easy to fix. On this episode, Guy explains common mistakes made by Hebrew learners — why they happen and how to correct them.

Love Me, Love Me Not

Did you know that “I loved her” in Hebrew can be expressed using only a single word? On this episode, Guy talks love. “Loving”, “in love”, “falling in love”, “love me, love me not”… he covers all the bases. We’re pretty sure you’re going to love this episode.

Side to Side

In Hebrew, צד is side. And what about its plural צדדים, sides? It’s a bit of a mouthful. Today Guy explains the different sides of צד, as well as useful expressions like, “fine by me” and “there are two sides to every story.”

Spoil Yourself Rotten

In Hebrew, מפונק is spoiled (as in a spoiled kid) while לפנק is to spoil. On this episode Guy explains how to spoil someone rotten, and how to talk about spoiled brats.

Ewww, That’s Gross

The word “mag’il” in Hebrew means disgusting. And even though we’re keeping it clean on the podcast, the topic of disgust might not be for everyone. That said, knowing how to say ”eeew gross” in Hebrew is critical! We think you’ll be fine as long as you’re not eating lunch.

Oh, You Poor Thing!

What do we say to a friend who’s in bed with high fever? And to someone who got a minor scratch? And to that one person who keeps on complaining but has no right to complain? Oy misken!